Dr. Jane’s Compatibility Meter… What Good Is It?

For years, I have written about the primary factors of long-term relationship satisfaction; Love, Loyalty and Shared Family Values. When my husband decided to convert my research on marital satisfaction into an App, I blissfully believed that my work was done. But upon publishing the App and describing its capability, we noticed that many couples looked on Dr. Jane’s Compatibility Meter as some sort of test. Often they asked “why do I need that, I’m already married” or “we’re happy; we don’t need that”. Their reactions suggested an underlying concern that the last thing these couples wanted to do was to “rock the boat!” Dr. Jane’s Compatibility Meter seemed to touch a nerve we did not mean to hit. The fact is that The Compatibility Meter is less about determining compatibility and more about increasing compatibility. Simply put, these questions offer a forum for couples to engage in meaningful conversation. When couples first meet, they usually spend a great deal of time talking. They talk about their histories, their likes, and dislikes. As they open up, share their deepest feelings, and hopefully feel accepted for who and how they are, love blossoms. We become increasingly attached to others the more we let them into our private thoughts and feelings. The Compatibility Meter simply offers up topics for couples who want to deepen their communication and their feelings for each other. Sometimes it’s difficult to know how to move from superficial to more meaningful topics for conversation. For those who are dating, it helps to know which questions they should be asking of this new love. For those who are cohabiting and considering marriage, these topics could very well help with the decision-making moving forward. For those who are married, it’s healthy to stay synchronized with your spouse so the two of you can stay on the same page and not go too far off-track as the year tick off. Dr. Jane’s Compatibility Meter is a relationship game that is based on legitimate research. Playing this game can lead to important conversations, new excitement as we learn new things about each other, and presents an opportunity to grow closer. Often the laughs and giggles that come with pillow-talk increase. After all, talking with your partner should be fun and meaningful! Shouldn’t...

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Communication isn’t perfect: Reminders to help couples keep their relationships healthy

Love, like many things in life, always seems easier at the beginning. When a relationship is new, it’s easy to feel connected and supported, but as our affection progresses, it is easy to become less thoughtful of each other’s feelings. One key to maintaining a healthy relationship is to encourage effective and clear communication, which can be difficult. Below are some common communication challenges to keep in mind so that you and your significant other can have a better, more open relationship. Communication can be elusive Ask anyone what he or she wants in a partner and you’re sure to hear “better communication.” When couples fall in love, they often attribute it to their ability to talk about anything and everything. When couples fall out of love, it’s because they can’t seem to talk about anything anymore. Make communicating with your loved one a priority. Take the time at least once a day to share something personal with each other. No television. No social networks. No distractions. Give one another your undivided attention. Communication can be difficult Humans are a sensitive lot. We long for validation yet hate criticism. We’re acutely cautious at the start of relationships, opening up slowly and carefully and quickly recoiling at the slightest hint of danger. It’s a difficult conundrum. On one hand, we want to share our private self with people. On the other hand, we’re afraid of being hurt. Maintain an attitude of support and affection by exchanging kind words; after all, doesn’t everyone deserve to feel good? Be sure to compliment your mate at least once a day. Communication can get lost Many people forget that communication is made up of more than words. It’s easy to ineffectively share our emotions or misinterpret our partner’s messages when we aren’t deliberate about the way we give and receive information. Pay attention to visual cues like facial expressions and body language. Watch for affirmation and a sense of understanding. If you think that your partner may not have understood, double back and clarify your message. It’s better to be redundant than to cause unnecessary harm. As a listener, give your partner your attention. Make eye contact where needed and show them that you are listening. Give them verbal and visual cues of understanding, like nodding. If you don’t understand their meaning, get more information. Communication can be hurtful Even after knowing someone for years, it is easy communicate carelessly and hurt one another’s feelings. Think before you speak, especially if you are emotional. Take time to cool off and think about your feelings. Quick, angry retorts may feel good at the moment, but can cause lasting damage in a relationship. It’s better to understand why you are upset so you can share with your partner in an effective, non-aggressive way. Remember, love is a physical and emotional relationship that must be nurtured every...

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Ray Rice: A letter to those who hurt the ones they love

While the Ray Rice NFL scandal has sent a shock wave through America, too many people will watch the news wondering if one day, they too will be exposed for their cruelty to others – spouse abuse. While the sports and entertainment industries glamorize violence, it is not okay to harm the people around you! From the time we are born, each one of us strives to control ourselves. In school and at home, we learn how to control ourselves by maintaining important boundaries. Our human charge is to maintain self-control — Not “other-control“. Those who hurt the ones they love, seek to control others because they feel out of control themselves. If you batter, abuse, punish or dominate another person, you are not just hurting one person. You are hurting an entire community. Realize that the pain you cause affects children, parents, friends, employers, co-workers, neighbors and in the case of Ray Rice, he has caused pain to the NFL and the entire country. You don’t have to feel out of control. Thousands of mental health professionals are trained to help break the cycle of abuse. Help yourself become more lovable. Self-control is a beautiful...

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LOSING LOVE IS NOT ALWAYS NECESSARY

There’s a part of the poem, No Loser, No Weeper in which Maya Angelou begins with the line, “I hate to lose something” and ends with, “…I mean I really hate to lose something”. In the poem, Dr. Angelou wrote of losing her doll, her wristwatch, and then, of losing love. In my work, I see people who have found love, lost love, abused love, and confused love. Here are a few thoughts on the matter. Sometimes parents and children lose their love for each other. Love between parents and children carries very high expectations. Parents and children alike are guilty of wanting to redesign each other’s personalities and increase each others’ strengths. Therein lies the loss. Instead, we must be willing to truly love each other as we are… imperfect beings who have some wonderful qualities that should be highlighted. Sometimes husbands and wives lose their love for each other. While dating, people tend to spend a lot of energy on being attractive to each other. The feeling of being in love is the incredible high that everybody seems to want. However, for some reason, after the wedding, some people stop making the effort to be attractive life companions to each other. Usually love relationships require a great deal of daily nurturance. So when love gets taken for granted, the people in the relationship become lonely. It takes continuous effort to keep a relationship synchronized, alive, fun and exciting. Emotional distancers prevent closeness in relationships. Things that are distancers come in all forms: they can be hiding places, activities, or substances. For example, the smoker who is confined to a certain part of the house may choose to spend a lot of time there alone. Some people like to hide inside their computers. Being an alcoholic is like having a love affair with the bottle. When this occurs, the intoxicated person is never really available to get to know others. Frequently, secret drug or food addictions cause people to withdraw from intimate relationships. It is easy for spouses to live parallel and separate lives when their work schedules conflict or they spend most of their time at home in different rooms. In the words of my best friend and husband, “If you’re not together, you’re not together.” Emotional losses occur when things become more important than people. Part of any relationship is a mutual process of sharing. Unfortunately, too many people are nonassertive “at the time” but carry away an unspoken grudge. Without the skills to communicate and solve problems, misunderstandings often lead to the demise of relationships between siblings, friends, and whole families. Sadly, lifelong relationships often end over money, opinions, or possessions. Being successful at marriage and family requires new skills. Today’s couples must learn communication skills, develop problem-solving routines, and learn how to work toward compatible lifestyles. When problems occur, we usually want to handle...

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ESTABLISHING RELATIONSHIPS

Today, for a variety of reasons, many adults find themselves living as Singles. Some have divorced, others are widowed, some have just not found their life partner… yet! So, it is not uncommon for those who have been in successive relationships to find themselves a bit battle-worn by the ups, downs, hurts and disappointments. Over the years, I have worked with a variety of singles of all ages. This post is dedicated to them. It takes time to heal from past relationships. Whenever we experience a loss, we are left with a sense of confusion. We wonder what went wrong, we replay our roles in search of understanding, and we question how to avoid the same mistakes next time. These are important learnings, and it takes “longer than you think” to learn them! It is important not to “hurry” or rush ourselves into the next relationship, even when it is difficult to be alone. It is important to learn from past relationships. In the end, we are left with memories. One constructive result is to analyze the relationship for the Red Flags that foretold of the mismatch in personalities, goals, and loss of communication. Many Red flags appeared at the beginning, and many were there all along. In new relationships, apply the principles of friendship. New “love” relationships often come with an acccumulation of expectations, but good friendships are built just one step at a time. As with any developing friendship, we must grow closer at a comfortable pace. When it feels uncomfortable, you owe it to yourself to step back and appraise how you feel. You may be experiencing a Red Flag. Each of us must be self-sufficient. No one else can bear the weight of meeting our needs; so we must be able to take care of ourselves. While single, become expert at standing on your own feet! Independence is a great personal quality; one which is often attractive to our next prospective partners. Interpersonal relationships are a great challenge… both to establish and to maintain. Healthy relationships require enough flexibility to allow for personal growth of all members, and enough time for enjoyable companionship. And if I haven’t mentioned it lately… we all deserve to be happy and fulfilled in our relationships!...

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FAIR FIGHTING FOR LOVERS

The ability to manage conflict is essential in healthy love relationships. While I often encourage couples to “bring their problems to the table” and brainstorm solutions together, I know this requires a fair amount of trust. We have to trust that we won’t be criticized, scolded or rejected. We have to trust that differences of opinion won’t turn into painful fights. Our love relationships are very precious to us. While there’s no escaping conflict, it is possible to use conflicts constructively. Here are a few more thoughts on the matter. Working through conflicts brings us closer together. Initially, all relationships are superficial. Relationships deepen when we achieve new levels of understanding and when we survive difficulties together. Couples who have been together a long time have usually survived a variety of trials and tribulations. When we combine our knowledge and experiences, we can help each other solve problems and we can watch each other’s back! We are always learning about ourselves and each other. Every one of us is like a tree. Each day we sprout a few new leaves, we stretch a little further, and we grow in some direction that changes us. This is a healthy part of life. Ideally, being in a relationship affords us someone who will help us celebrate that growth. Best friends share the story of their day, knowing that they will be encouraged, applauded or just listened to. Agree ahead of time not to criticize and not to be judgmental. Problem solving takes a bit of time and patience. If you wish to discuss a particular issue with your beloved, give him/her the gift of fair-warning. Usually we want to talk about things after we have thought about them for awhile, but our mates may be clueless that something’s on our mind. To be fair, our partners deserve a warning and some time to think about issues before being put on the spot. Say “ I’d like to have a conversation about money, sex, children, relatives, jealousy etc… not now, but let’s make a date to talk”. Good joint decisions require unrushed thought and open discussion. Agree ahead of time to work on problems until a mutually satisfying solution is found. Patience, trust and perseverance are valuable building blocks in long-term relationships. Stick and stones do break bones and names do hurt relationships. It is important to cool down when you are angry and avoid saying anything you might later have to apologize for. Every name that is called leaves a scar on our trust. Once there is scar tissue, it can feel unsafe to be open in a relationship. Before uttering cruel words, consider that they may cost you the entire relationship. There is a very steep price for losing your cool. When children sit down to play a game, they almost always ask each other, “what are the rules?” After...

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